Angebote zu "Revolution" (29 Treffer)

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Homemaker Revolution!
14,49 € *
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Homemaker Revolution! ab 14.49 € als Taschenbuch: Marie's Home Management System. Aus dem Bereich: Bücher, Kunst & Musik,

Anbieter: hugendubel
Stand: 18.09.2020
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The Supermen
0,17 € *
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After a rare speech at the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, Colorado, in 1976, programmers in the audience had suddenly fallen silent when Cray offered to answer questions. He stood there for several minutes, waiting for their queries, but none came. When he left, the head of NCAR's computing division chided the programmers. 'Why didn't someone raise a hand?' After a tense moment, one programmer replied, 'How do you talk to God?' -from The SUPERMEN The Story of Seymour Cray and the Technical Wizards behind the Supercomputer. They were building revolutionary, not evolutionary, machines. . . . They were blazing a trail-molding science into a product. . . . The freedom to create was extraordinary. -from The Supermen In 1951, a soft-spoken, skinny young man fresh from the University of Minnesota took a job in an old glider factory in St. Paul. Computer technology would never be the same, for the glider factory was the home of Engineering Research Associates and the recent college grad was Seymour R. Cray. During his extraordinary career, Cray would be alternately hailed as the Albert Einstein, the Thomas Edison, and the Evel Knievel of supercomputing. At various times, he was all three-a master craftsman, inventor, and visionary whose disdain for the rigors of corporate life became legendary, and whose achievements remain unsurpassed. The Supermen is award-winning writer Charles J. Murray's exhilarating account of how the brilliant-some would say eccentric-Cray and his gifted colleagues blazed the trail that led to the Information Age. This is a thrilling, real-life scientific adventure, deftly capturing the daring, seat-of-the-pants spirit of the early days of computer development, as well as an audacious, modern-day David and Goliath battle, in which a group of maverick engineers beat out IBM to become the runaway industry leaders. Murray's briskly paced narrative begins during the final months of the Second World War, when men such as William Norris and Howard Engstrom began researching commercial applications for the code-breaking machines of wartime, and charts the rise of technological research in response to the Cold War. In those days computers were huge, cumbersome machines with names like Demon and Atlas. When Cray came on board, things quickly changed. Drawing on in-depth interviews-including the last interview Cray completed before his untimely and tragic death-Murray provides rare insight into Cray's often controversial approach to his work. Cray could spend exhausting hours in single-minded pursuit of a particular goal, and Murray takes us behind the scenes to witness late-night brainstorming sessions and miraculous eleventh-hour fixes. Cray's casual, often hostile attitude toward management, although alienating to some, was more than a passionate need for independence; he simply thought differently than others. Seymour Cray saw farther and faster, and trusted his vision with an unassailable confidence. Yet he inspired great loyalty as well, making it possible for his own start-up company, Cray Research, to bring the 54,000-employee conglomerate of Control Data to its knees. Ultimately, The Supermen is a story of genius, and how a unique set of circumstances-a small-team approach, corporate detachment, and a government-backed marketplace-enabled that genius to flourish. In an atmosphere of unparalleled freedom and creativity, Seymour Cray's vision and drive fueled a technological revolution from which America would emerge as the world's leader in supercomputing.

Anbieter: reBuy
Stand: 18.09.2020
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The Invisible Organization: How Ingenious CEOs ...
9,95 € *
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Companies all over the world could greatly benefit from moving part or even all their staff to work from home as virtual employees. Using the techniques and strategies inside The Invisible Organization, all that is possible quickly and efficiently. If you are the CEO of a company that could benefit from generating more profits, shedding overhead, and thrilling staff, this book is a must-listen. A former CEO of Tony Robbins and Chet Holmes Business Breakthroughs, International, Russo successfully scaled the company with nearly 100 percent growth per year and about 300 remote staff, owning no infrastructure. Russo helps clients create the leadership management strategy as outlined in his book and advises CEOs on moving virtual with confidence. Why is this book different from other books on working virtually? It comes from the CEO's perspective as an operating executive, dealing with the strategy of creating momentum around changing the company slowly at first and then accelerating as results prove viable. The book is more of a blueprint designed to accomplish this singular act of internal revolution. 1. Language: English. Narrator: Aaron Sinn. Audio sample: http://samples.audible.de/bk/acx0/045849/bk_acx0_045849_sample.mp3. Digital audiobook in aax.

Anbieter: Audible
Stand: 18.09.2020
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Taking Charge: How to Make Things Happen in You...
9,95 € *
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Those who give away power surround themselves with loyal and powerful supporters. Far from the quagmire of "blind obedience", today's leadership requires empowerment at all levels. The world moves too fast for one person in any organization to make all the decisions. To compete and excel, entire organizations must move in unison, like well-practiced teams, where everyone is aiming toward similar goals. The old power pyramids of corporate America are crumbling and being replaced with fast, mobile leadership teams. It's a leadership revolution! Elements of which include: Flexibility Strategic and innovative thinking Simplicity Empowerment at all levels in the organization Communication flowing freely up and down the command structure One man who has the unique perspective to observe and analyze leadership, both in corporate America and the military, is retired Air Force Major General Perry M. Smith. As the on-air military expert for Cable News Network (CNN), he was on the scene throughout the peak of the action in "Desert Storm." With his firsthand insights into the leadership style of a cutting-edge communications company, CNN, and the new "manager-style" generals like Schwarzkopf, he fills Taking Charge with the most useful leadership ideas ever He also shares many of the lessons from his long and storied career. You may not associate words like "flexibility" with military leadership. However, in today's high-tech, high-speed, ever-changing world all the elements of the new leadership are essential for survival and success. Schwarzkopf himself drove this point home by emphasizing that to succeed, "it didn't take a hero." It took a special kind of management and leadership. 1. Language: English. Narrator: Perry M. Smith, Ph.D.. Audio sample: http://samples.audible.de/bk/ntgl/000336/bk_ntgl_000336_sample.mp3. Digital audiobook in aax.

Anbieter: Audible
Stand: 18.09.2020
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Marketing Management for the 21st Century
99,90 € *
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The 21st century has seen the advent of the new economy, thanks to the technology innovation and development. To understand the new economy, it is important to understand in brief characteristics and features of the old economy. Industrial revolution was the start point of the old economy with focus on producing massive quantities of standardized products. This mass product was important for cost reduction and satisfying large consumer base, as production increased companies expanded into new markets across geographical areas. The old economy had the organizational hierarchy where in top management gave out instructions which were executed by the middle manager over the workers. In contrast, the new economy has seen the buying power at all time thanks to the digital revolution.Consumers have access to all types' information for product and services. Furthermore, standardization has been replaced by more customization with a dramatic increase in terms of product offering. Purchase experience has also changed as well with the introduction of online purchase, which can be done 24 × 7 with products getting delivered at office or home.

Anbieter: Dodax
Stand: 18.09.2020
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Say It With Charts: The Executive's Guide to Vi...
47,05 € *
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Today's most comprehensive, up-to-date business presentation guidebookEasy-to-Follow Tools and Strategies for Creating Powerful, Interactive Business PresentationsAs a professional, your career relies on reaching audiences, convincing them that your message is valuable, then making them remember that message. Say It With Charts, 4th Edition , walks you through the entire visual presentation process and shows you step-by-step how to create compelling, memorable presentations.Business presentation tools have changed tremendously. A chart that once took ten hours and ten co-workers to prepare can now be produced by anyone with ten minutes and a computer keyboard. What hasn't changed, however, are the basics behind creating a powerful visual what to say, why to say it, and how to say it for the most impact.Say It With Charts, 4th Edition , reveals time-tested tips for preparing effective presentations, then shows you how to combine those tips with today's technologies for sharper, stronger visuals. Look to this comprehensive presentation encyclopedia for information on:How to prepare different types of charts pie, bar, column, line, or dot and when to use eachHands-on recommendations on lettering size, color choice, appropriate chart types, and moreTechniques for producing dramatic eVisuals using animation, scanned images, sound, video, and links to pertinent websites "When well-conceived and designed, charts help us communicate more quickly and more clearly than we would if we left the data in tabular form." From Chapter 1Business is about communication. Every day, scores of questions must be answered, and each answer must be communicated quickly, completely, and with a minimum of confusion. Time has become our most valuable, irreplaceable commodity, and in today's rapid fire, ultra-competitive business environment delays or errors in communicating information are uncalled for, unaffordable...and unacceptable.Say It With Charts, 4th Edition , shows you how to put your message in visual form and translate information and ideas into persuasive, powerful charts, visuals, and multimedia presentations holding your audience's attention as you communicate exactly what you want, with no confusion. The newest edition of this bestselling classic covers every important point from previous editions and, in addition, shows you how to use today's digital technologies to create professional-quality, attention-grabbing visuals on your computer screen.Everything you need to know to make your charts and visuals eye-catching and memorable is in these pages, including:Commandments for designing successful onscreen visualsTechniques for conveying your messages using visuals and visual metaphorsHow to decide when to use a chart and know when a chart could work against youGraphic representations of ineffective, counter-productive charts with examples of how they could be improvedTime- and money-saving methods to make one presentation template serve multiple audiencesHands-on practice projects and exercises to help you grasp each important concept Over the years, Say It With Charts has become the standard guidebook for executives, sales managers, management consultants all those who want to make their points clearly and concisely, whether speaking directly to a packed conference room or communicating on computer screens across the globe. Now updated for today's technological communications revolution, it will show you how to translate your most compelling data and messages into even more compelling visuals, and hammer home your message every time.

Anbieter: Dodax
Stand: 18.09.2020
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Euro Trash
20,00 € *
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EVEN THOUGH WE’RE ALL INTERNATIONALISTS, FOR NOW THE BOOK WILL ONLY BE AVAILABLE IN GERMAN.With contributions from Damir Arsenijevic, Alain Badiou, Étienne Balibar, Gracie Mae Bradley, Cédric Durand, the European Space Agency (sort of), Sara Farris, Alexandre Kojève, Maurizio Lazzarato, Sandro Mezzadra, Toni Negri, Thomas Piketty, Beatriz Preciado, Bernard Stiegler, Martin Wolf, Slavoj Žižek.And to top it all off, check out our exclusive “Europe from Detroit” mix that comes courtesy of acid legend Carlos Souffront.No, not another debate on Europe, not just the usual policy proposals, no moralising appeals. We simply want to take stock of our ignorance in order to turn it into something more productive. Call it recycling if you will. The contributions in the volume do not reflect anything like a unity of vision. Often, they agree on very little. But that doesn’t mean the texts assembled here do not resonate with one another. Philosophers, economists, journalists and activists comment on past and present manifestations of Europe. Taken together, these essays are exercises in defamiliarisation. Sure, we don’t fully understand what is going on. Then again, experts didn’t fare too well either, as a quick glance at the pre-2008 forecasts of economists, the analyses of geopolitical pundits or the trajectories of the expert-led transitional governments in Europe’s South reveals. That’s why we have no desire to wallow in passivity and fatalism. On the contrary, creating a sense of distance between Europe and ourselves will perhaps enable us to relate to it in new ways.Ever since the postwar reconstruction, Europe vacillated between grand political designs and economic expediency. The introduction of the Euro in 2002 and the ongoing crisis of 2008 have accelerated a shift in the balance of power. Nation-states lost some of their prerogatives and now have to accommodate the demands of unelected supranational entities in charge of implementing the precepts of economic rationality. A sense of powerlessness has become widespread. It has given a new lease of life to nationalism and xenophobia across Europe. Young people in particular wonder what could possibly be the point of having democracy conform to markets if capitalism cannot even make good on its one spellbinding historical promise: to enable wealth creation for the masses through individual effort and hard work? As is stands in 2014, giving up democratic principles in order to purify the operations of the markets seems like the surest way to the worst of both worlds: a technocratic caesarism. Economists tentatively hail Greece’s return to the capital markets, they rejoice at the first signs of positive growth rates and welcome, give or take some accounting tricks, the sound budgets in member-states that are testament to the efficacy of the austerity measures. Meanwhile, unemployment in many parts of the EU remains stubbornly high. And let’s not even talk about wage levels. Far from marking the end of history and the triumph of liberal market societies, 1989 could have turned out to be a Pyrrhic victory for capitalism, a possibility for which even François Furet allowed in his very last essays. Before its long overdue collapse, ‘real existing socialism’ - imperialist, authoritarian, unjust, inefficient, and downright depressing as it was - nonetheless inspired a fear among the governments of the so-called Western world that tamed capitalism in ways not seen before or after. Did bureaucratic state capitalism in the East protect the liberal capitalism of the West from what it wanted? Even when the latter seemed to be on excellent form after 1989, it often turned out to be pumped up on a diet of monetary steroids: soaring private and company debt sustained the boom times.Capitalism’s hold over the planet is neither uniform nor exclusively imposed by force. It emerged out of a contingent history of the “universalisation of a tendency”, as Deleuze and Guattari put it. However, a European left that has yet to come to terms with the full extent of its political insignificance seeks solace in the idea of an economic matrix that structures every fold of the social fabric: it is plausible, inescapable and terrifyingly good at harnessing even the forces of resistance to its own purposes. While the therapeutic aspect of this sort of thinking cannot be dismissed, its analytical virtues are more questionable. Still, as we survey the political landscape in 2014, no serious – and politically desirable – alternative exists. And yet liberal market societies struggle with ever more intense degrees of disaffection among their supposedly blessed populations. We observe the striking comeback of inequalities of wealth reminiscent of the Belle Époque. If current trends continue we could soon live in societies so unequal one would have to go back to the pre-industrial age to find anything comparable. This is certainly not a process of differentiation that is synonymous with modernity, as some commentators, grotesquely misinterpreting Luhmann, would have us believe. To reduce the potential of social differentiation to the acceptance of economic disparities betrays a poverty of thought that speaks volumes about the state of mind of a “brute bourgeoisie”, itself a symptom of a deeply dysfunctional society. In Merkel-land, it found a new party-political home in the “Alternative for Germany”.But opposition to the Euro also gains currency on the left. This is unsurprising given the intransigence of monetary hawks in the central banks and the institutional set-up of the Eurozone. Another Euro was possible, one that would have attempted to pave the way for an optimal currency area, rather than simply presupposing its existence.This would have required large-scale investments and significant redistributive efforts to harmonise - and raise - living standards in all of Europe. We need to unearth these counter-histories of the single European currency. As long as genuine political and social union is but a distant possibility, the imperative of price stability and the impossibility for individual Euro states to devalue their currency reduces the available range of political responses to economic distress to just one: the downward adjustment not just of economies but of entire welfare systems in order to restore competitiveness. However, there is no economic automatism here. These are deeply political decisions. As so often, economic liberalism knows very well when to portray itself as the arch-foe of oppressive states and undemocratic post-national institutions - and when to enlist their help in order to get its doctrinal way. Some conclude from this state of affairs that, provided it can be made politically productive, a break with the Euro regime should no longer be considered a taboo. Others are wary of reductive explanations that, for the sake of conceptual and political convenience, denounce the Eurozone as a monolithic neoliberal bloc. We stand to benefit a great deal from learning how to spot and exploit political divisions. Even inside the European Commission, there is room for forms of militant bureaucracy that deftly maneuver the legal labyrinthe (ranging from the 1953 European Convention on Social and Medical Assistance to the measures towards greater coordination of social security systems passed in 2004). Recent attempts to bully Merkel’s government into potentially widening access to welfare payments for European citizens living in Germany lent credence to this claim. One day, these regulatory squabbles might bring us a minuscule step closer to a Europe-wide unconditional basic income. Let the robots do the crap jobs. Given the jingoistic mood of most electorates, even many leftist parties are taking leave from demands for postnational social rights that are legally enforceable. They fear such a move would be tantamount to political suicide.Nonetheless, the track record of European institutions and the general tendency of intergovernmental decisions taken during the last two decades or so suggest that it would be insane to rely on emancipatory political action from above. Yet the question of exactly how to reclaim Europe as a battleground from below is close to intractable. What effective form could a dialectic between “institutional and insurrectional” politics take? New forms of entryism might play a role, as those who support Alexis Tsipras’ candidacy for the presidency of the European Commission argue. Mass pressure from the street would open a second flank. But even though they have been theorised for many years, European social movements worthy of their name continue to be conspicuous by their absence. Or should we push for individual states to give up their sovereignty and merge with their neighbour, thus creating political forms that mark an intermediate stage between the nation-state and and a European polity? It all sounds rather far-fetched. Interestingly, the recent protests in Bosnia oppose not just corrupt local elites, but also the institutions of the international community that purports to have pacified the remnants of former Yugoslavia. The revolution in the Ukraine that has courageously overthrown a deeply corrupt regime, on the other hand, did appeal to a EU that embodied hopes for a better political and economic life even as parts of the crowd openly displayed their neo-Nazi sympathies.We need to address the underlying identity issues haunting this continent as a whole and the individuals that inhabit it. It is impossible to overlook the signs of libidinal exhaustion. Europe has a problem with desire. The economic, political and social systems no longer produce pleasure. We’re all tired but we haven’t done nearly enough to explore and invent new lives. The family rushes in to fill this void. We grew accustomed too quickly to the omnipresence of “family-friendly” policies, by now a staple of European political language. We could have known better. In Anti-Oedipus, Deleuze and Guattari had warned us. As capitalism marches onward, all existing social relations will cede to its pull. But that’s not the same as simple disappearance. Quite the opposite. The family was first emptied of all historical functions, only to be reinvented as a bulwark against some of the more troubling and pathological aspects of contemporary capitalism. It offers respite from the constant flexibility that is expected of us, it helps pool resources as welfare states are being dismantled, it pays lip service to feminist struggles by singing the praise of the care work done by stay-at-home mums. In France, reactionaries are marching through the streets in their thousands. Their opposition to same-sex marriage forms part of a wider struggle to combat the rampant “family-phobia” in today’s societies. We want none of it. The hypocrisy is plain for everyone to see. There is significant overlap between the defenders of good old family values and the milieus in which shameless hostility to migrants has once again become acceptable. But some migrants are better than others. The latest version of the mother-father-family relies on cheap non-unionised female labour, the army of nannies recruited from abroad. These are some of the migrants that made it to Europe. Many others don’t even get that far.The activities of Frontex seem blissfully oblivious to the very colonial past they incessantly conjure up. The same fervour that was at work in the historical project of European expansionism is now observable in the systematic efforts to stop migrants - to ensure successful “border management”, as official parlance has it. Europeans used to invade foreign lands to enrich themselves, now they keep others out to protect their privileges. Images of drowned, starved or deported refugees don’t prevent European politicians for a second from invoking ‘our’ grand cultural tradition, preferably while lecturing other parts of the world on the West’s civilisational achievements: philosophy, human rights, dignity, you name it. Perhaps the treatment to which migrants are subjected has something to do with Europe’s historical self-understanding after all. These corpses float in the same Mediterranean sailed by cunning Ulysses. They’re dying to reach the shore they might have otherwise called home. This much is clear to us: as long as other people are treated like garbage in our name, we betray the potential of EURO TRASH.The costly insistence on rigid borders is not just a European problem. It’s a cosmic one. Space is a place where quaint attempts to divide it up according to the time-worn logic of sovereignty must fail. As Donald Kessler has pointed out as early as 1978, the debris piling up in the orbit, if unchecked, will reach a point where space travel becomes too dangerous. And little does it matter whether the out-there is littered by NASA or ESA. We might be stuck on this planet at the precise moment when we’d be well advised to leave it behind. Borders have a funny way of shutting in the people they claim to protect.There were concerns about a possible lack of German voices in this collection but acid legend Carlos Souffront came to our rescue and his exclusive “Europe from Detroit” mix dispels them in the most unexpected, poignant and concise way possible. Kraftwerk’s 1977 “Trans-Europe-Express” imagined the continent as a haven of post-historical nostalgia. We asked Carlos to reimagine Europe as a province of Detroit in order to invert the usual perspective. Often, the Motor City is an object of European musical desire, filled to the brim with projections even, and especially if there is post-industrial desolation to be admired. Let’s try it the other way around. The mix expertly strides between delicacy and a sense of impending dread that culminates in a brief sequence where German history unmistakably rears its ugly head. But there is life beyond that, there has to be. This is not a mind trip, this is a body journey.WE’RE THE EDITORS,WE’RE SVENJA BROMBERG, BIRTHE MÜHLHOFF, AND DANILO SCHOLZ.

Anbieter: Dodax
Stand: 18.09.2020
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The Pomodoro Technique
16,90 CHF *
zzgl. 3,50 CHF Versand

Available in bookshops for the first time, the internationally acclaimed time management system that has been used by millions, written by Francesco Cirillo, creator of the Pomodoro Technique. We all face the same problem: we're constantly busy but we never seem to get anything done. We know we should focus on the task in hand, but it feels impossible with so many distractions and demands on our time. We all need The Pomodoro Technique. This deceptively simple tool, now being used by more than 2 million people around the world, helps us regain control and achieve our goals. It transforms both work and home life by splitting days into 25-minute 'pomodoros', which focus our minds and make us far more productive. Drawing on more than two decades of refinement and thinking, this powerful little book will teach you how to . . . -Work with time -Eliminate burnout -Manage distractions -Create a better work/life balance . . . all using only a pen, some paper and a timer. Start now - and join the Pomorodo revolution. Fully updated edition with exclusive material on teamwork - to make you and your team more dynamic than ever.

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 18.09.2020
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Consumption and the Post-Industrial City
98,90 CHF *
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The consequences of the industrial transition with regard to its social, political and architectural effects are the issue of this book. Today, the basis of urban growth lies more in the hands of those who consume and therefore organize their social potential. As the consumption city is not simply one new industry that comes next, the mixture of different life styles is the necessary matrix for revitalization of urban life. Difference and diversity are challenging manifold the management of this transition, wherefore no blue print for the urban regeneration can be produced. Consumption valorizes the cultural capital of every place and transmits it to the market. Drawing on the unique history of the place, the diversification of the post-industrial city requires a specific approach addressing the local in its characteristic potentials and threats. Contents: Frank Eckardt: Consumption and the Post-Industrial City (Introduction) - Dieter Hassenpflug: City and Consumption - Derek Wynne/Justin O'Connor: Consumption and the Postmodern City - Sako Musterd: Four pictures of the Post-Industrial City - Francois Ascher: The Third Urban Revolution of Modernity - John Clammer: Culture and Consumption in the Post-Industrial City - Louise Nystr¿m: Quality of Urban Life in Europe in the 21st Century With a Focus on Three Nordic Capitals - Anna Karwi¿ska: Social and Spatial Transformations in Polish Cities at the Beginning of the 21st Century - Iskara Dandolova: Deurbanisation in Bulgaria: Challenges of Transition And Sustainable Development - Maria Manuela Mendes: Cities 'Archipelago' in the Metropolitan Area of Lisbon - Steven Miles: Consuming Cities; Consuming Youth: Young People's Lifestyles and the Appropriation of Cultural Space - Pase M¿p¿ Cultural Urbanisation of Helsinki: consumption, mobile phones and new ideal of planning - Martina Boese: Manchester's Cultural Industries: A Vehicle of Racial Ex-/Inclusion? - Isabelle Fremeaux/David Garbin: 'Community', Multi-culturalism and the Diasporic Negociation of Space and Identity in the East End of London - Jos¿april: Transnational Jade Formations of the Translocal Practices of Chinese Immigrants in a Lisbon Innercity Neighbourhood - Svetlana Tchervonnaia: The Moscow of the 21st Century - Ethnic and Confessional Colour of a Post-industrial City - Albrecht G¿schel: Local Community Identity Policy - Market Strategy, Cultural Education or the Home of the Citizens?

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 18.09.2020
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